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Most Common Tree Species in Pittsburgh

Variety of Trees

As you drive through Pittsburgh and the surrounding areas, you see trees everywhere. Trees line our highways and streets, they accent businesses, beautify parks, and adorn private properties. Sometimes we take these beautiful and important plants for granted, but they are integral to our environment and existence. There are 134 native trees found in the state of Pennsylvania, and in 2005 Pittsburgh was named “Tree City USA” by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Our region boasts some of the most glorious trees that can be found, especially when the leaves turn bright shades of orange, yellow, and red in the fall. The trees that are common to this area aren’t found everywhere, but they really do make our lives better. Some of the most important things that trees do for us are:

  • Provide Shade
  • Block Wind
  • Stabilize Soil
  • Prevent Water Runoff
  • Produce Oxygen
  • Absorb Carbon Dioxide
  • Provide Homes for Wildlife
  • Beautify the Landscape

There are several tree species that are common to the Pittsburgh area. The easiest way to identify them is by looking at their leaves, bark, and seeds.

Birch Tree: Easily identified because of its bright white bark.
Dogwood: This flowering tree is relatively smaller and boasts beautiful white or pink flowers in the spring.
Maple: The red maple is the most common type of maple tree in our region. The seeds of maple trees are “helicopters,” formally known as samaras. Maples’ leaves turn bright red or orange in the fall.
Eastern Hemlock: This evergreen tree takes 250-300 years to mature, has flat, pointed needles, and produces cones with rounded edges.
Pine: Feature needles that grow in clusters, are square, and are easily rolled between the fingers.
Elm: Leaves are oval shaped and have a saw-toothed edge. They turn golden-yellow in the fall.
White Oak: Identifiable by their unique leaf shape and the production of acorns, these trees live up to 400 years.
Sycamore: Smooth, whitish bark and fan-shaped leaves identify this common tree.

Hopefully, the next time you take a walk through your neighborhood or hike through the woods, you’ll be able to identify the trees you see. If you have questions or need help with the trees on your residential or commercial property, call Horhut Tree Experts. Our team of professionals is dedicated to keeping your trees healthy, safe, and beautiful.

 

Jaime Horhut